Rest API V1 Pools

MailerQ offers IP pools for easy management of your sending IP addresses.

GET

A GET request to pools returns all pools. It returns a JSON array of pools, see the example below.

GET /v1/pools HTTP/1.0
Authorization: Bearer ...

Might result in

HTTP/1.0 200 Ok
Content-Type: application/json
...

[
    {
        "name": "sharedpool1"
    },
    {
        "name": "dedicated",
        "description": "Dedicated Addresses"
    }
]

In this example, there are 2 pools defined.

To get the actual IP addresses in a pool, you can do a GET request to poolips?name=NAME. The example below returns the IPs in pool "sharedpool1" from the example above.

GET /v1/poolips?name=sharedpool1 HTTP/1.0
Authorization: Bearer ...

This will return the list of IP addresses currently in the pool called NAME:

HTTP/1.0 200 Ok
Content-Type: application/json
...

[
    {
        "ip": "127.0.0.1",
        "name": "sharedpool1"
    },
    {
        "ip": "192.168.1.1",
        "name": "sharedpool1"
    }
]

POST

A POST request to pools allows you to create a new IP pool. For the request format, see the table below.

Field Required Type Description
name yes string The name of the new pool
description no string Description of the pool, for human use.

For example, the request below will create the pool from the second example under GET with a json formatted body

POST /v1/pools HTTP/1.0
Content-Type: application/json
Authorization: Bearer ...

{
    "name": "dedicated",
    "description": "Dedicated Addresses"
}

and equivalently, with urlencoded body

POST /v1/pools HTTP/1.0
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Authorization: Bearer ...

name=dedicated&description=Dedicated+Addresses

To add an IP address to an existing pool, you can do a POST request to poolips. This needs the name of the pool and the address to be added:

Field Required Type Description
ip yes string The name of the existing pool
name yes string The address to be added
POST /v1/poolips HTTP/1.0
Content-Type: application/json
Authorization: Bearer ...

{
    "ip": "127.0.0.1",
    "name": "sharedpool1"
},

Naturally, POST requests to poolips can also be done with urlencoded data.

DELETE

A DELETE request to pools allows you to remove a pool. This only needs the name of the pool to be removed:

DELETE /v1/pools HTTP/1.0
Authorization: Bearer ...
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

name=sharedpool1

This will also remove all addresses associated with that pool.

To remove a specific address from a pool, you can do a call to poolips with the name of the pool and the address you want to remove:

DELETE /v1/poolips HTTP/1.0
Authorization: Bearer ...
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

name=sharedpool1&ip=127.0.0.1

DELETE requests, like post requests, support both JSON and urlencoded formats.